Store Legal Federal Money Laundering Regulation: Banking, Corporate and Securities Compliance, Second Edition
Federal Money Laundering Regulation: Banking, Corporate and Securities Compliance, Second Edition Federal Money Laundering Regulation: Banking, Corporate and Securities Compliance, Second Edition

Federal Money Laundering Regulation: Banking, Corporate and Securities Compliance, Second Edition

By Steven Mark Levy
Select Format
Internet price is for a three-month subscription.
Looseleaf
$489.00
Internet
$391.00
Available on Cheetah! Learn More

Looseleaf

Available: Ships in 3-5 Business Days
Price
$489.00
Qty.
This product is available for the standing order program.
Add to Cart

Internet

Price
$391.00
Includes 3-month access for one license. Need a demo or annual access? Contact Sales
Add to Cart
Please note, once you complete your purchase, Cheetah registration instructions and login credentials to access your 3-month online subscription will be emailed to you within one business day.
Overview

Federal Money Laundering Regulation: Banking, Corporate & Securities Compliance, by Steven Mark Levy, is your complete guide to understanding and complying with all U.S. statutes, regulations, and case law on money laundering. This valuable reference provides in-depth guidance on compliance programs, due diligence, Bank Secrecy Act reporting and recordkeeping, money laundering crimes, civil and criminal asset forfeiture, terrorist financing, OFAC compliance, and state and international measures against money laundering. Twice-yearly supplements enhance the value and utility of this treatise—now in its 18th year— in this rapidly evolving field.

Designed for both beginners seeking a general understanding of a topic, and seasoned professionals grappling with critical issues, the new Second Edition reflects a significant reorganization and expansion over the previous edition. The 31 chapters provide a step-by-step guide for corporate counsel, litigators, accountants, compliance officers, prosecutors and government regulators representing or pursuing affected industries—banks, credit unions, casinos, insurance companies, securities broker-dealers, futures commission merchants, mutual funds, dealers in precious metals, loan and finance companies, money transmitters, dealers in foreign exchange, and an ever-expanding list of other businesses large and small deemed “financial institutions.”
 
Money laundering laws are complex, and consequences for noncompliance harsh, including large civil and criminal fines, asset forfeitures, prison sentences of up to 20 years, and infliction of reputational harm. Federal Money Laundering Regulation is the one core holding in this area that will guide you through most regulatory questions you are likely to encounter, in readable, plain English.
 
A related volume by the same author, Wolters Kluwer’s Regulation of Securities: SEC Answer Book, Fifth Edition, offers guidance on the day-to-day requirements of the federal securities laws that affect all public companies.

Note: Online subscriptions are for three-month periods.

Pages 1408
Last Updated 12/06/2018
Product Line Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory U.S.
ISBN 9781454859765
SKU 10046100-7777
Product Line Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory U.S.
SKU 000000000010071764
Table of Contents

PART I: BACKGROUND

Chapter 1 UNDERSTANDING MONEY LAUNDERING

  • 1.01 Introduction to Money Laundering
  • 1.02 History of Money Laundering
  • 1.03 Definition of Money Laundering
  • 1.04 Scope of Anti-Money Laundering Regulation
  • 1.05 Why Launder Money?
  • 1.06 Amount of Money Laundered
  • 1.07 Why Combat Money Laundering?
  • 1.08 Financial Institution Anti-Money Laundering Obligations
  • 1.09 Anti-Money Laundering Regulatory Burden
  • 1.10 Money Laundering as a Crime
  • 1.11 Financial Investigations
  • 1.12 National Money Laundering Strategy
  • 1.13 Failure of Resolve?
  • 1.14 Annual Anti-Money Laundering Conferences
  • 1.15 Money Laundering and Tax Evasion

Chapter 2 MONEY LAUNDERING METHODS

  • 2.01 How Money Is Laundered
  • 2.02 Three Stages of Money Laundering
  • 2.03 Bulk Cash Smuggling
  • 2.04 Money Laundering Through Banks
  • 2.05 Money Laundering in the Gaming Industry
  • 2.06 Money Laundering Via Money Services Businesses (MSBs)
  • 2.07 Securities Industry
  • 2.08 Insurance Industry
  • 2.09 Precious Metals and Jewels
  • 2.10 Front Companies
  • 2.11 Trade-Based Money Laundering
  • 2.11A Funnel Accounts
  • 2.12 Money Laundering Through Shell Companies
  • 2.13 Money Laundering Through Lawyers
  • 2.14 Money Laundering Through Accountants
  • 2.15 Money Laundering Via Informal Value Transfer Systems
  • 2.16 Money Laundering by Lawmakers
  • 2.17 Money Laundering and Sports

Chapter 3 MONEY LAUNDERING LEGAL FRAMEWORK

  • 3.01 Anti-Money Laundering Legal Framework
  • 3.02 Bank Secrecy Act (BSA)
  • 3.03 Comprehensive Crime Control Act (CCCA) of 1984
  • 3.04 Money Laundering Control Act (MLCA) of 1986
  • 3.05 Money Laundering Prosecution Improvements Act of 1988
  • 3.06 Crime Control Act of 1990
  • 3.07 Annunzio-Wylie Anti-Money Laundering Act (1992)
  • 3.08 Money Laundering Suppression Act (MLSA) of 1994
  • 3.09 Money Laundering and Financial Crimes Strategy Act of 1998
  • 3.10 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act (CAFRA) of 2000
  • 3.11 USA Patriot Act (2001)
  • 3.12 Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism Convention Implementation Act of 2002
  • 3.13 Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004
  • 3.14 USA Patriot Improvement and Reauthorization Act of 2005
  • 3.15 Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009
  • 3.16 Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act

Chapter 4 ROLE OF FEDERAL AGENCIES

  • 4.01 Summary
  • 4.02 Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN)
  • 4.03 Internal Revenue Service (IRS)
  • 4.04 Banking Agencies
  • 4.05 Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
  • 4.06 Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC)
  • 4.07 Self-Regulatory Organizations (SROs)
  • 4.08 Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA)
  • 4.09 U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)
  • 4.10 U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
  • 4.11 Department of Justice
  • 4.12 Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
  • 4.13 Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)
  • 4.14 BSA Advisory Group (BSAAG)

Chapter 5 TERRORIST FINANCING

  • 5.01 Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing
  • 5.01A Terrorist Groups
  • 5.02 Terrorist Funding Needs
  • 5.03 Terrorist Funding Sources
  • 5.04 Moving Funds
  • 5.05 Terrorist Financing Crimes
  • 5.06 Executive Order 13224
  • 5.07 Private Right of Action—Anti-Terrorism Act (ATA)
  • 5.07A Private Right of Action—Alien Tort Statute (ATS)
  • 5.08 OFAC Sanctions Against Terrorist Financing
  • 5.09 Constitutionality of Terrorist Financing Laws
  • 5.10 Role of Financial Institutions Against Terrorist Financing
  • 5.11 Investigation and Prosecution of Terrorist Financing

PART II: PROGRAMS

Chapter 6 ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING PROGRAM

  • 6.01 Anti-Money Laundering Program—Purpose and Importance
  • 6.02 Anti-Money Laundering Program—Statute
  • 6.03 Anti-Money Laundering Program—Regulations
  • 6.04 Anti-Money Laundering Program—General Considerations
  • 6.05 Anti-Money Laundering Program—Penalties
  • 6.06 Definition of Financial Institution
  • 6.07 Banking Industry Anti-Money Laundering Program
  • 6.08 Casino and Card Club Anti-Money Laundering Program
  • 6.09 Money Services Business Anti-Money Laundering Program
  • 6.10 Securities Broker-Dealer Anti-Money Laundering Program
  • 6.11 Mutual Fund Anti-Money Laundering Program
  • 6.12 Insurance Companies
  • 6.13 Futures Commission Merchants and Introducing Brokers
  • 6.14 Dealers in Precious Metals, Stones, Jewels
  • 6.15 Operators of Credit Card Systems
  • 6.16 Loan or Finance Companies
  • 6.17 Housing Government Sponsored Enterprises
  • 6.18 Investment Advisers
  • 6.19 Other Financial Institutions

Chapter 7 CUSTOMER IDENTIFICATION PROGRAM

  • 7.01 Purpose and Importance
  • 7.02 Statute
  • 7.03 Regulations
  • 7.04 General Considerations
  • 7.05 Penalties
  • 7.06 Banks
  • 7.07 Casinos
  • 7.08 Money Services Businesses
  • 7.09 Brokers or Dealers in Securities
  • 7.10 Mutual Funds
  • 7.11 Insurance Companies
  • 7.12 Futures Commission Merchants and Introducing Brokers
  • 7.13 Dealers in Precious Metals, Stones, Jewels
  • 7.14 Operators of Credit Card Systems
  • 7.15 Loan or Finance Companies
  • 7.16 Housing Government Sponsored Enterprises
  • 7.17 Investment Advisers

Chapter 7A BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP REQUIREMENTS FOR LEGAL ENTITY CUSTOMERS

  • 7A.01 Beneficial Ownership and Money Laundering
  • 7A.02 Beneficial Ownership Rule (1010.230)
  • 7A.03 Compare: Customer Due Diligence Rule (1020.210(b)(5))
  • 7A.04 Definition of Covered Financial Institution
  • 7A.05 Definition of Beneficial Owner
  • 7A.06 Definition of Legal Entity Customer
  • 7A.07 Definition of New Account
  • 7A.08 Identifying Beneficial Owners of Legal Entity Customers
  • 7A.09 Verifying Identity of Beneficial Owners
  • 7A.10 Certification Regarding Beneficial Owners
  • 7A.11 Exemptions from Beneficial Ownership Requirements
  • 7A.12 Updating Beneficial Ownership Information
  • 7A.13 Beneficial Ownership Recordkeeping
  • 7A.14 Reliance on Another Financial Institution for Beneficial Ownership
  • 7A.15 Beneficial Ownership Relevance to Other Legal Requirements
  • 7A.16 Supervisory Examination Procedures for Beneficial Ownership

Chapter 8 INFORMATION SHARING

  • 8.01 Introduction to BSA Information Sharing
  • 8.02 Information Sharing Statute—Section 314
  • 8.03 FinCEN Information Sharing Regulations
  • 8.04 Information Sharing Definitions
  • 8.05 FinCEN Information Request Procedure
  • 8.06 Responding to a FinCEN Information Request
  • 8.07 FinCEN Information Request—No Other Action Required
  • 8.08 FinCEN Information Request and Customer Privacy Laws
  • 8.09 Critique of the Information Request System
  • 8.10 Flow of BSA Information from FinCEN
  • 8.11 Information Sharing Among Financial Institutions—Section 314(b)
  • 8.12 BSA Information Sharing Liability Safe Harbor
  • 8.13 FinCEN Exchange

Chapter 9 DUE DILIGENCE FOR CORRESPONDENT AND PRIVATE BANKING

  • 9.01 Correspondent Banking and Money Laundering
  • 9.02 Due Diligence for Correspondent Accounts for Foreign Banks
  • 9.03 Correspondent Accounts—Basic Due Diligence
  • 9.04 Correspondent Accounts—Enhanced Due Diligence
  • 9.05 Correspondent Accounts—Record of Owners/Agent
  • 9.06 Correspondent Accounts—Additional Requirements
  • 9.07 Correspondent Accounts—Foreign Shell Banks
  • 9.08 Due Diligence for Private Banking Accounts for Non-U.S. Persons
  • 9.09 Government Access to Foreign Bank Records
  • 9.10 Forfeiture from Interbank Account Held by Foreign Bank
  • 9.11 Penalties

Chapter 10 OFAC COMPLIANCE

  • 10.01 About OFAC
  • 10.02 OFAC Legal Framework
  • 10.03 OFAC Relation to Anti-Money Laundering
  • 10.04 OFAC Sanctions Against Countries
  • 10.05 Sanctions Against Listed Persons (SDNs)
  • 10.06 Blocked Transactions
  • 10.07 Prohibited Transactions
  • 10.08 Reports
  • 10.09 Licenses
  • 10.10 Compliance Program
  • 10.11 Examination
  • 10.12 Enforcement
  • 10.13 Civil Penalties
  • 10.14 Criminal Penalties

PART III: RECORDS AND REPORTS

Chapter 11 RECORDKEEPING

  • 11.01 Overview of BSA Recordkeeping
  • 11.02 Sale of Monetary Instruments, $3,000 to $10,000
  • 11.03 Foreign Financial Accounts
  • 11.04 Extensions of Credit and International Transfers
  • 11.05 Funds (Wire) Transfers
  • 11.06 The Travel Rule
  • 11.07 Geographic Targeting Order Records
  • 11.08 Additional Records: Banks
  • 11.09 Additional Records: Securities Broker-Dealers
  • 11.10 Additional Records: Casinos and Card Clubs
  • 11.11 Additional Records: Money Services Businesses
  • 11.12 Record Retention
  • 11.13 Enforcement

Chapter 12 REPORTING

  • 12.01 Introduction to Bank Secrecy Act Reporting
  • 12.02 Overview of BSA Reporting Requirements
  • 12.03 Each BSA Reporting Rule Stands Independent
  • 12.04 How Government Uses BSA Information
  • 12.05 Re-Dissemination Guidelines
  • 12.06 BSA E-Filing
  • 12.07 Getting Answers to Questions
  • 12.08 Requesting an Administrative Ruling
  • 12.09 Using Automated Systems to Facilitate BSA Reporting

Chapter 13 CURRENCY TRANSACTION REPORT (CTR)

  • 13.01 Currency Transaction Report—Introduction
  • 13.02 Currency Transaction Report—Statute
  • 13.03 Currency Transaction Report—Regulations
  • 13.04 Currency Transaction Report—Constitutionality
  • 13.05 Currency Transaction Report—General Considerations
  • 13.06 Filing Obligation—Financial Institutions Other Than Casinos
  • 13.07 Filing Obligation—Casinos
  • 13.08 Filing Obligation—Customers
  • 13.09 Aggregation of Currency Transactions
  • 13.10 Aggregation—Casinos
  • 13.11 Structured Transactions
  • 13.12 Transactions of Exempt Persons
  • 13.13 Geographic Targeting Order
  • 13.14 Verifying Customer Identity for CTR Purposes
  • 13.15 Completing the CTR
  • 13.16 Filing the CTR
  • 13.17 Penalties for Currency Transaction Report Violations

Chapter 14 SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY REPORT (SAR)

  • 14.01 Suspicious Activity Report—Introduction
  • 14.02 Suspicious Activity Report—Statute
  • 14.03 Suspicious Activity Report—Regulations
  • 14.04 Suspicious Activity Report—Purpose and Importance
  • 14.05 Suspicious Activity Report—Former Regulatory Scheme
  • 14.06 Suspicious Activity Report—Definition of Transaction
  • 14.07 Transactions Reportable as Suspicious
  • 14.08 Suspicious Activity Report—Marijuana-Related Transactions
  • 14.09 Suspicious Activity Report—Confidentiality
  • 14.10 Suspicious Activity Report—Liability Safe Harbor
  • 14.11 Corrected SARs
  • 14.12 Penalties for SAR Non-Compliance
  • 14.13 Banking Industry Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.14 Casino and Card Club Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.15 Money Services Business Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.16 Securities Broker-Dealer Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.17 Mutual Fund Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.18 Insurance Company Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.19 Futures Industry Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.20 Dealer In Precious Metals, Stones, or Jewels Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.21 Credit Card System Operator Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.22 Loan or Finance Company Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.23 Housing Government Sponsored Enterprise Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.24 Investment Adviser Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.25 U.S. Postal Service Suspicious Activity Report
  • 14.26 Real Estate Industry Suspicious Activity Report

Chapter 15 CURRENCY RECEIVED IN TRADE OR BUSINESS (FORM 8300)

  • 15.01 Statute
  • 15.02 Purpose
  • 15.03 Sections 5331 and 6050I Compared
  • 15.04 Regulations
  • 15.05 Compare: Currency Transaction Report
  • 15.06 Definition of Currency
  • 15.07 Who Must File
  • 15.08 Multiple Payments
  • 15.09 Exceptions to Reporting
  • 15.10 Structuring Prohibited
  • 15.11 Using Form 8300 for Suspicious Transactions
  • 15.12 Completing Form 8300
  • 15.13 When and Where to File
  • 15.14 Statement to Be Provided
  • 15.15 Examination for Compliance
  • 15.16 Penalties

Chapter 16 REPORT OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORTATION OF CURRENCY (CMIR)

  • 16.01 Understanding CMIR Reporting
  • 16.02 Statute
  • 16.03 Regulations
  • 16.04 Definitions
  • 16.05 Persons Required to File
  • 16.06 Aggregation
  • 16.07 Structuring
  • 16.08 Completing the CMIR
  • 16.09 Filing the CMIR
  • 16.10 Border Searches for CMIR Compliance
  • 16.11 CMIR Civil Enforcement
  • 16.12 CMIR Criminal Prosecution
  • 16.13 Bulk Cash Smuggling

Chapter 17 FOREIGN BANK ACCOUNT REPORT (FBAR)

  • 17.01 Introduction to Foreign Bank Account Report (FBAR)
  • 17.02 FBAR Statute
  • 17.03 FBAR Regulations
  • 17.04 General Considerations
  • 17.05 Persons Required to File
  • 17.06 Reportable Accounts
  • 17.07 Special Rules for Certain FBAR Filings
  • 17.08 Completing the FBAR
  • 17.09 Filing the FBAR
  • 17.10 Amending the FBAR
  • 17.11 FBAR Recordkeeping
  • 17.12 Examination for FBAR Compliance
  • 17.13 FBAR Civil Penalties
  • 17.14 FBAR Criminal Penalties
  • 17.15 FBAR Statute of Limitations
  • 17.16 IRS Disclosure Programs—Background
  • 17.17 IRS Disclosure Programs—Current
  • 17.18 John Doe Summons
  • 17.19 DOJ Swiss Bank Program

Chapter 18 REGISTRATION OF MONEY SERVICES BUSINESS

  • 18.01 Money Services Business (MSB) Registration Overview
  • 18.02 The Money Services Industry
  • 18.03 Statute and Regulations Governing MSB Registration
  • 18.04 Persons Required to Register as MSBs
  • 18.05 Persons Not Required to Register
  • 18.06 Completing FinCEN Form 107
  • 18.07 Persons Responsible for Filing
  • 18.08 When and Where to File
  • 18.09 Supporting Documentation
  • 18.10 List of Agents
  • 18.11 Access to Registration Records
  • 18.12 Protecting Confidential Information
  • 18.13 Ceasing to Be an MSB
  • 18.14 Examination for Compliance
  • 18.15 Civil Penalties
  • 18.16 Criminal Penalties—18 U.S.C. 1960

PART IV: CRIMES

Chapter 19 MONEY LAUNDERING OFFENSES GENERALLY

  • 19.01 Overview of Federal Money Laundering Crimes
  • 19.02 Why Understand Money Laundering Crimes?
  • 19.03 Road to Criminalizing Money Laundering
  • 19.04 Why Prosecutors Favor Money Laundering Charges
  • 19.05 Prosecutorial Approval, Consultation, and Notification Requirements
  • 19.06 Prosecutorial Abuse
  • 19.07 Expert Testimony in Money Laundering Cases
  • 19.08 Corporate Criminal Liability
  • 19.09 Specified Unlawful Activity (SUA)

Chapter 20 DOMESTIC FINANCIAL TRANSACTION—1956(a)(1)

  • 20.01 Introducing Section 1956(a)(1)
  • 20.01A Venue
  • 20.02 Elements
  • 20.03 Each Transaction a Separate Violation
  • 20.04 Multiplicity
  • 20.05 Duplicity
  • 20.06 Definition of Transaction
  • 20.07 Definition of Financial Transaction
  • 20.08 Affecting Commerce
  • 20.09 Conducts a Transaction
  • 20.10 Proceeds
  • 20.11 Proceeds—United States v. Santos
  • 20.12 Proceeds Must Exist Before They Can Be Laundered
  • 20.13 Knowledge
  • 20.14 Intent to Promote
  • 20.15 Intent to Evade Taxes
  • 20.16 Concealment Laundering
  • 20.17 Avoiding Reporting Requirement
  • 20.18 Attempt
  • 20.19 Aiding and Abetting
  • 20.20 Penalties
  • 20.21 Jurisdiction Over Foreign Persons

Chapter 21 INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORTATION—1956(a)(2)

  • 21.01 Introducing Section 1956(a)(2)
  • 21.02 Elements
  • 21.03 Transportation, Transmission, or Transfer
  • 21.04 Each Transfer a Separate Violation
  • 21.05 Monetary Instrument or Funds
  • 21.06 Intent to Promote
  • 21.07 Knowledge of Unlawful Proceeds
  • 21.08 Knowledge of Design to Conceal or Disguise or to Avoid Reporting
  • 21.09 Willful Blindness
  • 21.10 International “Sting” Operations
  • 21.11 Jury Instructions
  • 21.12 Attempt
  • 21.13 Aiding and Abetting
  • 21.14 Penalties

Chapter 22 UNDERCOVER INVESTIGATION—1956(a)(3)

  • 22.01 Introducing Section 1956(a)(3)
  • 22.02 Illustrations of Undercover Investigations
  • 22.03 Definition of Financial Transaction
  • 22.04 Definition of Represented
  • 22.05 Intent to Promote
  • 22.06 Intent to Conceal or Disguise
  • 22.07 Intent to Avoid Reporting
  • 22.08 Entrapment Defense to Money Laundering Sting Operation
  • 22.09 Outrageous Government Conduct
  • 22.09A Santos Merger Problem
  • 22.10 First-Time Offender
  • 22.11 Ignorance of the Law
  • 22.12 Attempt
  • 22.13 Aiding and Abetting
  • 22.14 Penalties

Chapter 23 MONETARY TRANSACTION IN CRIME PROCEEDS—1957

  • 23.01 Introducing Section 1957
  • 23.02 Jurisdiction
  • 23.03 Elements
  • 23.04 Compare: Section 1956(a)(1)
  • 23.05 Monetary Transaction
  • 23.06 Monetary Transaction—Attorneys Fee Exception
  • 23.07 Effect on Commerce
  • 23.08 Criminally Derived Property
  • 23.09 Value Greater Than $10,000
  • 23.10 Value Greater Than $10,000—Commingling
  • 23.11 Knowledge
  • 23.12 Knowledge—Willful Blindness
  • 23.13 Derived from Specified Unlawful Activity
  • 23.14 Attempt
  • 23.15 Aiding and Abetting
  • 23.16 Statute of Limitations
  • 23.17 Penalties
  • 23.18 Restitution

Chapter 24 CONSPIRACY TO COMMIT MONEY LAUNDERING

  • 24.01 Introducing the Crime of Conspiracy
  • 24.02 Statutes
  • 24.03 Venue
  • 24.04 Elements
  • 24.05 Agreement
  • 24.06 Rule of Consistency
  • 24.07 Unlawful Object
  • 24.08 Knowledge
  • 24.09 Knowledge—Willful Blindness
  • 24.10 Intent
  • 24.11 Overt Act
  • 24.12 Proving the Conspiracy
  • 24.13 Prosecuting Laundering as a Drug Conspiracy
  • 24.14 Pinkerton Rule
  • 24.15 Withdrawal
  • 24.16 Statute of Limitations
  • 24.17 Double Jeopardy
  • 24.18 Penalties for Money Laundering Conspiracy
  • 24.19 Restitution to Victims of Money Laundering Conspiracy
  • 24.20 Unindicted Co-Conspirator

PART V: FORFEITURE

Chapter 25 FORFEITURE—GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • 25.01 Introduction
  • 25.02 Administrative vs. Criminal and Civil
  • 25.03 Historical Background
  • 25.04 Forfeiture Statutes—Criminal
  • 25.05 Forfeiture Statutes—Civil
  • 25.06 Civil Forfeiture Abuse
  • 25.07 Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 (CAFRA)
  • 25.08 Supreme Court Cases
  • 25.09 Justice Department Policies
  • 25.10 Equitable Sharing of Forfeited Property

Chapter 26 CRIMINAL FORFEITURE

  • 26.01 Introduction to Criminal Asset Forfeiture
  • 26.02 Criminal Forfeiture—Statutes
  • 26.03 Criminal Forfeiture—Procedure
  • 26.04 Criminal Forfeiture—Standard of Proof
  • 26.05 Criminal Forfeiture—Mandatory Component of Sentence
  • 26.06 Forfeiture Limited to Defendant’s Ownership Interest
  • 26.07 Personal Money Judgment Forfeiture
  • 26.08 Property Subject to Forfeiture
  • 26.09 Substitute Assets
  • 26.10 Joint and Several Liability for Forfeiture Amount
  • 26.11 Application of Excessive Fines Clause to Forfeiture
  • 26.12 Offset
  • 26.13 Third Party Rights to Forfeited Property
  • 26.14 Third Party Rights—Procedure
  • 26.15 Pretrial Restraint of Assets

Chapter 27 CIVIL FORFEITURE

  • 27.01 Introduction to Civil Asset Forfeiture
  • 27.02 Civil Asset Forfeiture Statutes
  • 27.03 Disfavored Remedy?
  • 27.04 Need for an Underlying Offense
  • 27.05 Property Involved In or Traceable To
  • 27.06 Funds in Interbank Account Held by Foreign Bank
  • 27.07 Property Used to Facilitate
  • 27.08 Fungible Property—Section 984
  • 27.09 Innocent Owner Defense
  • 27.10 Excessive Fines Clause
  • 27.11 Double Jeopardy
  • 27.12 Statute of Limitations
  • 27.13 Transfer of Forfeited Assets to Foreign Country
  • 27.14 Terrorist Assets—Section 981(a)(1)(G)
  • 27.15 Terrorist Assets—IEEPA
  • 27.16 Civil Asset Forfeiture Procedure

PART VI: STATE AND INTERNATIONAL

Chapter 28 STATE LEGISLATION

  • 28.01 Overview of State Anti-Money Laundering Legislation
  • 28.02 Role of State Anti-Money Laundering Legislation
  • 28.03 Federal-State Cooperation
  • 28.04 State Money Laundering Legislation
  • 28.05 Regulation of Money Services Businesses (MSBs)

Chapter 29 INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

  • 29.01 Anti-Money Laundering at the International Level
  • 29.02 Elements of Effective Anti-Money Laundering Legislation
  • 29.03 Multinational Conventions
  • 29.04 Financial Action Task Force (FATF)
  • 29.05 FATF-Style Regional Bodies
  • 29.06 Egmont Group of Financial Intelligence Units (FIUs)
  • 29.07 Basel Committee on Banking Supervision
  • 29.08 International Association of Insurance Supervisors
  • 29.09 International Monetary Fund (IMF)
  • 29.10 International Organization of Securities Commissions
  • 29.11 Wolfsberg Group
  • 29.12 Notable International Money Laundering Prosecutions

Chapter 30 OF PRIMARY MONEY LAUNDERING CONCERN

  • 30.01 Introduction to Section 311 Special Measures
  • 30.02 Designating a Primary Money Laundering Concern
  • 30.03 Available Section 311 Special Measures
  • 30.03A Special Measures—Economic and Diplomatic Considerations
  • 30.04 Definition of Correspondent/Payable-Through Account
  • 30.05 Selecting One or More Special Measures
  • 30.06 Exceptive Relief from Rules Requiring Special Measures
  • 30.07 Table of Section 311 Jurisdictions/Institutions
  • 30.08 FinCEN Interpretations
  • 30.09 Defending the Blackened Institution
  • 30.10 Major Money Laundering Countries

Table of Cases

Index

Volumes