Good cause for voluntary quit lacking where claimant simply disapproved of employer’s business conduct
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Friday, October 23, 2020

Good cause for voluntary quit lacking where claimant simply disapproved of employer’s business conduct

By Payroll and Entitlements Editorial Staff

The claimant, a senior project manager for a mapping software and systems company, said he discovered critical safety issues with products under his purview and resigned his position, citing his reasons for leaving as concerns with product safety, a lack of urgency in selling products under his purview, and disagreements over his scope of authority. The court rejected the claimant's argument that the fact the company made unsafe products violated his sincere moral beliefs. Mere disapproval of the employer’s method of conducting business does not constitute statutory good cause for voluntarily resigning. The claimant must have notified the employer of the objectionable condition unless doing so would be futile. Further, the new work must directly affect the claimant’s moral beliefs, and the objectionable condition must exist in fact, rather than be mere speculation. Although the statute requires the objectionable condition to exist in fact, the ALJ noted that there was no evidence in the record to show the products were actually unsafe. Accordingly, the administrative record provided substantial evidence that the claimant voluntarily resigned without good cause and thus was not entitled to receive benefits (Donald L. Mitchell v. ESD, Wash. Ct. of App., Division One (Unpub. Op.), No. 80319-1-I, September 28, 2020).

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