Good cause did not exist for claimant’s resignation where scheduling change made it difficult but not impossible to get daughter to school
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Friday, June 19, 2020

Good cause did not exist for claimant’s resignation where scheduling change made it difficult but not impossible to get daughter to school

By Payroll and Entitlements Editorial Staff

The claimant, a certified medical assistant for a medical foundation, had her schedule adjusted by 15 minutes at the start and the end, making it difficult for her to get her daughter to school. After the claimant's mother suffered a heart attack, the claimant was approved for leave of up to four hours a day but was sometimes absent for up to eight hours a day. The claimant resigned from her position with the medical foundation but asserted that, despite the voluntary termination of her employment, she was entitled to immediate unemployment benefits under statutory exceptions for good cause. The court rejected her arguments that her voluntary resignation was due to good cause, ruling that the scheduling change made it difficult, but not impossible to transport her daughter to school and that the claimant failed to prove that her previous schedule was a condition of her employment. Thus, the court affirmed the denial of benefits (Rebecca S. Leitner v. LIRC, Wis. Ct. of App., Dist. IV (Unpub. Op.), No. 2019AP1196, May 7, 2020).

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