Claimant denied benefits where his actions were not that of a “reasonable employee”
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Friday, September 27, 2019

Claimant denied benefits where his actions were not that of a “reasonable employee”

By Payroll and Entitlements Editorial Staff

The claimant received a written warning for not following procedures. He refused to sign the warning and filed a grievance, which was denied. The next month he was placed on administrative leave due to his refusal to sign the warning. He later quit his job after signing a separation agreement. The record suggests that the employer tried to discuss with the claimant his persistent refusal to sign the warning, but the claimant did not come to the meeting. A reasonable employee, who believed he had been wrongly accused of something, would have actively pursued a discussion and tried to resolve the issue in a constructive way, rather than feeling compelled to resign. The claimant was denied benefits because he quit his employment without good cause (Daniel Carson v. PACT Charter School, DEED, Minn. Ct. of App. (Unpub. Op.), No. A18-1776, 7/29/2019).

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