Senate committee works to understand balance between drug innovation, affordability


June 16, 2017

Drug pricing is a complex system in the United States, and costs vary significantly between different payers and consumers for a number of reasons, including rebates and discounts offered by manufacturers, drug patents, agreements with insurers, and changes from volume- to value-based payment systems. In a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions titled "The Cost of Prescription Drugs: How the Drug Delivery System Affects What Patients Pay," experts testified about who pays for prescription drugs, and what that money pays for. In his opening statement, Committee Chair Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn) explained that this is the first of three planned hearings; the second hearing will consider the full drug delivery process and its associated costs, and the third hearing will focus on ensuring patient access to affordable drugs.

Dan Mendelson, President, Avalere Health, said in his testimony that consumer drug prices are "determined jointly by health system design, pharmaceutical company pricing, and decisions by health plans, pharmacy benefit management (PBM) practices, and other transactions involving distributors and pharmacies along the supply chain." He explained that total costs often include payments for (1) the product; (2) services provided; (3) shipping; (4) rebates; (5) pharmacy reimbursement; and (6) costs associated with PBMs and third-party payers including reimbursement, share of rebates, and contractual obligations. Mendelson noted that most patients pay cost-sharing for prescription drugs based on list price, not net price, because many rebates are not shared directly with consumers. He added that the patient protections included in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) led to payers increasing deductibles for consumers in order to offer lower monthly premiums. However, he said, the ACA’s cost-sharing reductions have allowed individuals using the health insurance exchange to pay less for drugs; Mendelson reminded committee members that the American Health Care Act (AHCA) (H.R. 1628) in its current form would repeal cost-sharing reductions.

Allan Coukell, Senior Director of Health Programs, Pew Charitable Truststestified that net pharmaceutical spending has increased 42 percent since 2006, but two-thirds of that growth has occurred in the past four years. He listed the following limitations on effective drug pricing competition:

  • monopoly pricing for new drugs;
  • lack of competition for some older drugs;
  • misaligned incentives and incomplete information for stakeholders, including payers, providers and patients at many points in the system, and
  • a historical willingness to cover new therapies without ensuring that their clinical benefits justify the price.

Coukell said that the cost of new medicines is rising, and that is largely responsible for increased drug spending—for example, high-cost specialty products, particularly biologics that are not used by many individuals, account for more than 40 percent of drug spending. He suggested that the 12 years of exclusivity granted to biologic manufacturers, particularly when compared with the five years that drug manufacturers get, is excessive.

Paul Howard, Ph. D., Senior Fellow and Director of Health Policy, Manhattan Institute, also spoke about the challenges involved with specialty medicines, such as those that treat hepatitis C, cystic fibrosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. He said noted that the vast majority of prescription drugs are "highly affordable," and that the "outlook for innovation has never been brighter," but mentioned the need for increased competition to reduce waste and ineffective care. Howard recommended that Congress "create incentives that reward providers who use medicines (both generic and branded) and technology to deliver care as efficiently as possible, while also empowering patients with the information they need to identify high quality providers." He suggested changes to the 340B drug discount program, HHS and FDA coordination on safe harbors for innovative contractual arrangements, and broader Medicare, Medicaid, and patient-empowerment reforms.

Gerard Anderson, Ph.D., Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, also blamed high costs on specialty drugs and chronic conditions, but added that state and federal health care programs cannot afford to continue paying high prices for these expensive drugs for Medicare and Medicaid recipients, and are being forced to make "life or death decisions." His recommendations are increasing competition and changing policies to increase access to pharmaceuticals, such as including drugs in bundled payments and accountable care organizations (ACOs) while eliminating rebates from PBMs and prescription drug plans. Anderson also recommended cracking down on abuse of orphan drug designations and allowing branded drugs to move to the generic market sooner. He suggested that negotiating drug prices, specifically by a single designated federal agency using existing authority under 28 U.S.C. §1498, and enacting price-gauging legislation.

Companies: Avalere Health; Pew Charitable Trusts; Manhattan Institute; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Legislation: CongressionalHearings 340BNews AccountableCareNews AccessNews AgencyNews BiologicNews BiosimilarNews CostSharingNews DrugNews InsurerNews MedicarePartDNews PharmaServicesNews PremiumNews NewsFeed

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